How to cook Lumpiang Sariwa

Lumpiang Sariwa orFresh Spring Roll is a vegetable dishcomposed of different vegetables with a soft (unfried) wrapper garnished with sweet sauce and crushed peanuts. Some popular variations of this dish are lumpiang ubod (made with heart of palm) and lumpiang hubad (Unwrapped lumpiang sariwa).

Lumpiang Sariwa

Lumpiang Sariwa

Ingredients:

Filling
2 cups sweet potato, cubed
2 tbsp fish sauce (patis)
1 lb cabbage, shredded
1 ½ cup carrots, julienned
½ cup water
½ cup peanuts, crushed
6 pieces Lettuce leaves
½ lb pork, thinly sliced
1 pack extra firm tofu, sliced in strips
1 cup shrimp, shelled and deveined
2 cups string beans (baguio beans), chopped
1 medium sized onions, chopped
½ cup cilantro, chopped
3 tbsp garlic, minced
1 pork cube

Wrapper
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 pieces raw eggs
2 tbsp cooking oil
½ tsp salt
1½ cups milk
Sauce
1 tbsp soy sauce
½ cup brown sugar
2 cups water
½ pork cube
1 tbsp garlic, minced
2 tbsp corn starch (diluted in 4 tbsp water)

Cooking Procedure:

1. Cook the Filling

1.1. In a heated pan, pour-in the cooking oil then sauté the garlic and onions
1.2. Add the pork and cook until color turns light brown
1.3. Put-in the pork cube and add ½ cup water then simmer until pork is tender
1.4. Add the shrimps and sweet potatoes and cook for 5 minutes or until potatoes are soft
1.5. Add the tofu and cook for a few minutes
1.6. Put-in the cilantro, carrots, and string beans then mix with the other ingredients
1.7. Add the cabbage and let cook for 5 minutes
1.8. Add the fish sauce and mix. Set aside

2. Make the wrapper

2.1. In a mixing bowl, crack the eggs and beat
2.2. Add the milk while beating
2.3. Put in the salt and all-purpose flour then mix thoroughly
2.4. Add the vegetable oil and mix well
2.5. Turn the stove on to medium heat and put the non-stick pan in place
2.6. Spray the pan with oil or grease with butter
2.7. Pour-in the wrapper mixture (about half a cup) and tilt the pan to distribute the liquid evenly
2.8. Cook until the top part of the mixture is dry (about 2 minutes)
2.9. Using a spatula, remove the cooked mixture and place in a flat plate. Set aside

3. Make the sauce

3.1. In a saucepan, pour the water and bring to a boil
3.2. Add the brown sugar and pork cubes
3.3. Put some salt and soy sauce then mix well
3.4. Dilute the cornstarch in water and pour in the saucepan.
3.5. Cook until the sauce becomes thick. Set aside.

4. Wrap the filling

4.1. Place the wrapper in a plate then place a lettuce leaf in the middle top part of the wrapper.
4.2. Spoon the filling and place in the middle of the wrapper (over the lettuce leaf)
4.3. Close the wrapper by folding the lower part first then roll the sides until the filling is sealed

5. Pour the sauce over the Lumpiang Sariwa and garnish with crushed peanuts and minced garlic.

How to cook Longganisa

Longganisa (or longanisa, or longaniza) are Filipino chorizos. These cured sausages are famous in almost every Philippine region. The famous varieties of longganisa are : Vigan , Lucban, and Guagua which were named according to the town that they came from. Pork is the most common meat used in making this sausage; Chicken, beef, and even tuna are sometimes used as alternatives.

This Longganisa Recipe that we have here involves curing the meat using Prague powder and sodium phosphate. Prague Powder or pink curing salt is responsible in preserving the meat and inhibits the growth of certain bacteria. Sodium phosphate, on the other hand, acts as an emulsifier. It makes to immiscible ingredients (like fat and liquid) mix together in complete harmony. Aside from these ingredients, extenders such as carageenan and TVP are required only if you will be using this for commercial purposes. If this will be for personal consumption, then extenders are not necessary.

It is very important that you follow the measurement of the ingredients as stated in the recipe below. Using more than the required ingredients (especially the curing ingredients) is not good.

If you are living in outside of the Philippines, you can purchase the ingredients online. I get mine from americanspice(.com) and spiceage(.com). I was also able to get the hog casing online. As far as stuffing the meat into the casing, you can do it manually or with a little help from your stand mixer. I am using a Kitchen Aid stand mixer and I bought the sausage grinder and stuffer attachment which proved to be very helpful.

Logganisa

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 lbs ground pork
  • 1 tbsp coarse salt
  • 1/2 tsp Prague powder #1
  • 1 tsp sodium phosphate
  • 1/4 cup cold water
  • 1/4 cup TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein)
  • 1 tbsp Isolate
  • 1/2 tsp Carrageenan
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 6 tbsp garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsp paprika (for color)
  • 3 tbsp Anise Liquor
  • 1 tbsp ground black pepper
  • 2 tbsp pineapple juice
  • 1/2 tsp meat enhancer (optional)

Cooking Procedure

  1. In a large container mix the salt, prague powder, phosphate, Anise liquor, and water
  2. Add the Textured Vegetable Protein, Isolate, and Carrageenan
  3. Add the ground pork followed by the sugar, garlic, paprika, ground black pepper, pineapple juice, and meat enhancer then mix thoroughly.
  4. Place inside the refrigerator for 12 hours. (Note: Take note of the time. The mixture will smell sour if left for more than 12 hours)
  5. Shape and Wrap the longanisa individually

How to cook Pinoy Pork Barbeque

Pinoy Pork Barbeque are marinated slices of pork speared in bamboo skewers and grilled to perfection. Though this might sound like the western famed barbecued pork, this delicious Filipino version of the barbeque has a lot of difference specifically in terms of preparation and appearance.

This grilled dish can be considered as a street food because it is sold in barbeque stands on street corners along with isaw ng baboy (grilled pig’s intestine), betamax (grilled chicken blood), isaw ng manok (grilled chicken intestine) and other similar street foods.

The thing that I like most about Pinoy Pork Barbeque is its rich flavor: the marinade does its job by ingesting all the flavors in the pork while the grilling process provides additional smokiness making this grilled Filipino Food stand out.

As far as I am concerned, Pinoy Pork Barbeque won’t be complete without the spicy vinegar. Do you remember the tall coffee jars in barbeque stands that contain the spicy vinegar dip? I like soaking my barbeque in that vinegar dip and I intentionally scoop the floating chopped onions as I pull the stick out. This will taste even better with cold soda by your side Delicious!

Pork Barbecue

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs pork, sliced
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • Lemon juice from 1 piece lemon
  • 1/2 cup banana ketchup
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 8 cloves garlic, crushed and chopped

Cooking Procedure

  1. Combine pork, soy sauce, lemon juice, ketchup, salt, ground black pepper, brown sugar, and chopped garlic in a mixing bowl then mix the ingredients well. Make sure that all ingredients are properly distributed; using your hands in mixing the ingredients is recommended.
  2. Marinate the pork in the mixture overnight. Make sure to refrigerate the marinade to avoid contamination. If in case you are so eager to grill right away, allow at least 3 hours for the meat to absorb the flavors.
  3. Skewer the sliced pork using a bamboo skewer (this is also the same as the barbeque stick that we know).
  4. Grill the pork until both sides are done. Use the leftover marinade as basting sauce. Try adding a few tablespoons of soy sauce, ketchup, and a tablespoon of cooking oil to create the perfect basting sauce.
  5. Serve with spicy vinegar. Share and enjoy!

How to cook Pancit Habhab

Pancit Habhab or Pancit Lucban is a pancit version that originated from the Quezon province. This noodle dish might look like the traditional Pancit Canton, but there are some notable differences. Pancit Habhab uses dried flour noodles which are known as miki Lucban. These are not the same noodles used in pancit canton; it is also different from the fresh miki noodles, which are made fresh and have softer texture. This pancit version is served over a piece of banana leaf and is eaten without any utensils. How? Imagine eating a sandwich. You will need to grab the banana leaf with noodles and put it directly to your mouth. Don’t eat the banana leaf though. I’m not sure if Miki-Lucban is available in some Filipino stores in the US. We got this from our good friends as a pasalubong from their Philippine vacation. This is best eaten with vinegar. I usually put about a teaspoon of cane vinegar for every serving.

Pancit Habhab

Pancit Habhab

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. Miki Lucban
  • 1/2 lb. pork belly thinly sliced and chopped
  • 4 to 5 cups beef broth
  • 1/2 lb. shrimp, cleaned
  • 1/4 lb. pig’s liver, sliced
  • 1 piece chayote, sliced
  • 1 cup bok choy (or pechay), chopped
  • 1 cup snap pea or snow pea
  • 3/4 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Banana leaf, cleaned and cut into 5 x 5 inch pieces

Cooking Procedure

  1. Heat 3 tablespoons of cooking oil in a wide cooking pot.
  2. Stir-fry the chayote, snap pea, carrots, and bok choy for 3 to 4 minutes. Set aside.
  3. On the same cooking pot, add remaining oil. Put-in the pork slices. Cook for 5 minutes or until the oil from the pork comes out.
  4. Put-in the onion and garlic. Cook for 2 minutes.
  5. Add the liver. Stir.
  6. Add the shrimp. Cook each side for 1 minute. Remove the shrimp and then set aside.
  7. Sprinkle the ground black pepper and pour-in soy sauce.
  8. Pour-in the beef broth. Let boil. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  9. Put-in the Miki Lucban noodles. Cook while stirring until the noodles absorbs the liquid.
  10. Add half of the stir-fried vegetables. Stir.
  11. Arrange on top of each banana leaf and then top with shrimp and more vegetables.

How to cook Bagnet

Bagnet is deep fried pork belly meat, the Ilocano version of Lechon Kawali where the lean meat is crispy but not dry and the pork skin with all the pork fat is fried to a crisp, also known as Ilocano Chicharon Baboy.  Filipinos are lovers of deep fried crispy pork with its skin on, here are some of the famous Filipino deep fried pork dishes; Pork Chicharon, Crispy Pata, and Lechon kawali.

Bagnet is very easy to cook, it does not require much ingredients but more oil is a must since Bagnet is a Deep-fried dish.  Just be careful when cooking or deep frying Bagnet, expect a lot of hot oil splashing.

Here’s our version of the  Ilocako or Vigan Bagnet Recipe, best served with a dipping sauce of Bagoong Isda.

Bagnet

Bagnet

Ingredients

  • 2 kilo pork liempo (pork belly), whole cut
  • 1/2 head garlic
  • 1 tsp. peppercorns
  • 2 tbsp salt
  • 1 bay leaves
  • cooking oil for frying

Instructions:

  • Wash pork belly, cut into large chunks and place in a large pot.
  • Add enough water to cover the pork belly.
  • Add in salt, peppercorns, garlic, bay leaves.
  • Cover and bring to a boil, then lower heat to simmer for 30-45 minutes or until pork is tender. Remove all scum that rises.
  • Remove from the pot and place in a colander and let sit for a while so the liquid will drain. Prick the skin many times using fork then Dry with paper towels if necessary. Keep refrigerated for several hours.
  • In a large kawali heat enough cooking oil and deep fry pork belly at low heat for 30-45 minutes or until the pork turns brown.
  • Remove pork belly from the kawali and drain oil in a colander or paper towels, allow to cool completely.
  • Reheat the same oil over moderate heat deep fry the pork belly once more for 10-15 minutes or until golden brown, crisp and blisters appear on the skin. Drain on paper towels.
  • Chop bagnet to serving pieces and serve immediately with a selection of sukang Iloko or tomatoes and onions with bagoong isda dip.

Bagnet cooking tips:

To make sure the boiled pork is completely dry, pat with paper towels before frying.

The oil should be very hot when you put the pork in. Use long tongs so you?re not too near the pan because the oil will splatter. Have a cover for the pan ready and cover the pan immediately to protect yourself from the oil.

 

 

How to cook Pinakbet

Pinakbet is a tasty vegetable dish made-up of different fresh vegetables, pork, and shrimp paste. This Pinakbet Recipe is a variation of the popular Tagalog version of this dish, Pakbet Ilokano, that originated from the Ilocos Region.

This Pinakbet recipe is comprised of different vegetables such as eggplant (talong), squash (kalabasa), sting beans (sitaw), ampalaya (bitter melon), okra, and others. Since there are quite a number of ingredients required, I usually carry a shopping list and buy the freshest produce from a nearby market on the day that I’ll cook them. When it comes to the Shrimp paste, I always buy an extra bottle from the Asian store so that I won’t run out of stock.

Before I forget…have that rice cooker going because you might need some extra rice. Oh…one more thing. Have a cold soda (soft drinks) on your side or some cold juice to get rid of that shrimpy taste after you’re done. You will suely love this Pinakbet recipe. Happy cooking!

Pinakbet

Pinakbet

Ingredients

  • 1/4 lb pork, thinly sliced
  • 1 large egg plant, sliced
  • 1 medium-sized bitter melon, chopped
  • 1/4 lb squash, chopped into 2×1 inch cubes
  • 3 pieces large tomato, sliced
  • 1 piece onion, chopped
  • 1 tbsp ginger, minced
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 6 to 8 pieces okra
  • 1 bunch string beans, cut in 3 inches length
  • 4 tbsp shrimp paste
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tbsp cooking oil
  • salt and pepper

Cooking Procedure

  1. Heat the pan and put the cooking oil.
  2. When oil is hot enough, saute the garlic, ginger, onion, and tomato
  3. Add the pork and cook until color turns light brown (about 5 to 8 minutes)
  4. Put-in the shrimp paste and cook for 2 minutes.
  5. Add water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes or until pork is tender
  6. Put-in the squash and cook for 5 to 7 minutes or until texture becomes soft
  7. Add the remaining vegetables and mix with the other ingredients.Simmer for 5 minutes or until all the vegetables are cooked. (Do not overcook the vegetables)
  8. Serve hot with steamed white rice. Share and Enjoy!

How to cook Batute or Stuffed frog

Batute or Stuffed frog in english is also one of Kapampangan exotic dishes. They also call this as “tugak” around Pampanga. It tastes like chicken and it’s really good.

Farmers in Pampanga used to depend on rain water to irrigater their farms. Children would then catch the frogs, which came out during the rainy season, while their parents cultivated the land or planted rice. Outwitting the frogs has been a traditional “family bonding” ritual. Batute is a play of words on butete, which means “tadpole” in the local dialect. Batute is the entire frog stuffed with minced pork – so it looks like a very fat frog. It is then deep-fried in oil.

Betute

Batute or Stuffed frog

Ingredients:

1. 8 big edible frogs (palakang bukid)
2. 1/4 kilos ground pork
3. 3 cloves of minced garlic
4. 1/2 teaspoon salt (for pork stuffing)
5. 1 tablespoon vinegar (for pork stuffing)
6. 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper (for pork stuffing)
7. 1 teaspoon of salt (for marinade)
8. 4 tablespoon of vinegar (for marinade)
9. 1 teaspoon ground pepper (for marinade)
10. 1 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar (for marinade)

 

How to cook:
1. In a bowl, combine the ground pork, minced garlic, salt, vinegar and ground pepper. Set aside.
2. Clean the frog and remove the skin, head and cut the belly to remove the intestines.
3. Use the ground pork mixture as belly stuffing’s. Sew to prevent the stuffing’s from spilling out.
4. Mix the marinating mixture: salt, vinegar, ground pepper and brown sur.
5. Pour into the stuffed frogs.
6. Let it stand for 30 minutes.
7. The let it sun-dried for another 30 minutes.
8. Deep fry until golden brown.
9. Serve with fried rice or steamed plain rice.